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  1. What is an IP address?
  2. What is a domain name?
  3. What are the components of a domain name?
  4. What is a URL?
  5. What is a DNS?
  6. What does it mean "to host" a domain name?
  7. What does it mean to "park" a domain name?
  8. Where do I get information about the DNS?
  9. What is WEB(domain) forwarding?
  10. Can I change my domain forwarding to point to another Website and if so, how many times can I change it?
  11. What is a Registrant?
  12. What is a Registrar?
  13. What is Registry?
  14. Can I register a .web, .firm or .shop address?
  15. Why do I have to prepay for my domain name registration?
  16. Once I have a domain name secured, how long may I use it?
  17. How do I change my domain name?
  18. What if my desired name is the same as a trademarked name?
  19. Will my name and contact information be publicly available?
  20. What if the name I want to use is already taken?
  21. How long does it take to register a domain name?
  22. Who is the Administrative Contact?
  23. Who is the Billing Contact?
  24. Who is the Technical Contact?
  25. I've read the FAQ and I still have questions, who can I contact?

 

What is an IP address? Every computer on the Internet has a numeric address called IP Address that is used to identify the location of the computer. An example of an IP address is 192.168.223.121. This kind of addressing system is cumbersome and hard to remember for humans. Having a domain name will eliminate the need to remember an IP address.

What is a domain name? Domain names are easy to remember names for computers on the Internet. They correspond to a series of numbers called Internet Protocol numbers (IP address) that serve as routing addresses on the Internet. Domain names are used generally as a convenient way of locating information and reaching others on the Internet. Here are some domain names you might be already familiar with:
microsoft.com - Microsoft Corp.
ucla.edu
- University of California Los Angeles
iNameStore.com - this cite.

What are the components of a domain name? A domain name consists of two or more words separated by a dot. The last word (the far right) is called a "top-level domain". To the left of the top-level domain is what is called the "second-level domain". For example, in iNameStore.com, "iNameStore" represents a second-level domain within the top-level domain of .com. It is also possible to have a domain name in the form of something.iNameStore.com. In this case the "something" is called a "host" name or a "sub-domain" or third-level domain. Often "www" is used as sub-domain.

Here are some common top-level domains (TLDs) and their use:
.COM - Used for commercial entities. It is the most popular top-level domain. Anyone can register a .com domain.
.NET - Originally used for networking organizations such as Internet Service Providers and backbone providers. Today, anyone can register a .net domain.
.ORG - Designed for miscellaneous organizations, including non-profit groups. Today, anyone can register a .org domain.
It is not necessary to register a host or sub-domain with a
registrar before being able to use it. Currently only second-level domain has to be and can be registered within .COM, .NET, .ORG top-level domains. Please note that a domain name is a unique identifier. No two websites can have the same domain name. This is the reason why you should register your second level domain name before someone else does.

Two letter domains, such as .uk, .de, .jp and others, are called country code top level domains (ccTLDs) and correspond to a country, territory, or other geographic location. The rules and policies for registering domain names in the ccTLDs vary significantly and some are reserved for use by citizens of the corresponding country. Within most ccTLDs you can register only third-level domains since second-level domains are fixed by corresponding local authorities. You should check with the registrar offering ccTLD registration services regarding the specific terms and conditions for registration. Some registrars provide registration services in the ccTLDs in addition to registering names in .com, .net and .org; however, ICANN does not specifically accredit registrars to provide ccTLD registration services.

What is a URL? It stands for Universal Resource Locator which is used by browsers to locate and load files from Internet. URL describes domain name, file name and type of communication protocol. Some people refer to it as a web address.

An example of a URL is http://www.iNameStore.com/index.html.
This URL refers to file "index.html" stored in root directory of the server
"www.inamestore.com".
"http://" indicates type of communication protocol.

What is a DNS? DNS stands for "Domain Name Server" or in wide sense "Domain Name System". A domain name server is similar to a phone book. It tells the Internet programs (e.g. web browsers) where to go by translating the domain name into an Internet (IP) address. For example, if someone wants to access this website (www.iNameStore.com), the DNS will translate the domain into the IP address 204.174.223.72, which will allow the computer to locate our web server. In order for you to register your own second-level domain you need to know Domain Name System (DNS) server to host it.

What does it mean "to host" a domain name? In order to run your WEB site you need to create HTML pages using appropriate HTML editor and:

  1. Deploy HTML pages onto computer having IP address and connected to Internet.
  2. Ask your Internet Service Provider (ISP) to include corresponding reference to your HTML pages into their DNS server database. Roughly, this reference links IP address of your computer, its domain name and directory location of the HTML pages.

This process is called "hosting". When Internet users enter your WEB address (URL) into their browser bar, your hosting DNS server directs them to your HTML pages. Every Internet Service Provider (ISP) has its own DNS servers. If you do not have your own registered second-level domain name ISP usually can place at you disposal domain name in the form "www.YourName.YourISPname.com" or "www.YourISPname.com/users/~YourName" if it is not used by another WEB site. If you need to have your WEB address in the form "YourName.com" or "YourName.net" or "YourName.org" you have to register your own second-level domain name. During registration you need to indicate DNS server hosting your domain name.

At any time you still have the option to move your registered domain name to another Internet Service Provider (ISP) or Host provider. As a rule, for that you need to contact and advise your Registrar, previous ISP and new ISP. In order for this operation to be legal some Registrars require to receive approval of the transfer both from old and new DNS server administrators. Usually this takes 24-48 hours to transfer domain name to another host.

What does it mean to "park" a domain name? If you register domain name but do not know where you will host your WEB site some of Registrars propose to park your site. That is they offer you to use Registrar's DNS server but without actual placing your WEB pages onto Registrar's server. In this case anyone trying to reach your WEB site by browser will get page "Site under construction!".

Where do I get information about the DNS? Typically you will get the DNS information from your web hosting company. The DNS information includes domain name of DNS server and its numerical IP address. Example: NS1.HYPERMART.NET ; IP Address: 206.253.222.65
IP address by domain name or domain name by IP address can be obtained using
WHOIS service.

What is WEB(domain) forwarding? If you register your domain name with Registrar using "park" option you can ask to redirect your WEB users to any existing WEB site when they try to reach your site. In this way you can register several domain names and point all of them to one existing WEB site. Say, if you host a free personal Web page with your current Internet Service Provider or another form of free web site your web address for that site probably looks something like this http://www.ispname.com/users/~YourName (very hard to remember) or http://www.YourName.ispname.com (still too long). With domain forwarding you can point your domain name to the above Web site. All someone has to do is type in your domain name (http://www.YourDomName.com ) in the address window of their browser, it will then forward them directly to your current Web site. Note: If you change ISPs you can then change your domain forwarding to point to your new Web site address at your new ISP, with no confusion to your clients because your domain name stays the same).

Can I change my domain forwarding to point to another Website and if so, how many times can I change it? Technically it is possible to change forwarding as often as you wish. But practically it depends on rules implied by your Registrar. Some of Registrars do not restrict your modifications, some ones do. Moreover, domain forwarding option can be free of charges or cost you money. This is also up to the Registrar.

What is a Registrant? The entity, organization, or individual listed as the owner of the domain name (of second level) is known as the registrant.

What is a Registrar? The organization responsible for the actual registration of the domain name is known as the registrar.

What is Registry? The organization responsible for the actual administration and maintenance to a top-level domain is known as the registry. ICANN is the new non-profit corporation that is assuming this responsibility from the U.S. Government for coordinating certain Internet technical functions, including the management of Internet domain name system. More information about ICANN can be found at http://www.icann.org .

Can I register a .web, .firm or .shop address? .firm, .shop, .web, .arts, .rec, .info and .nom domains are listed under a proposed domain list by the CORE - Council of Internet Registrars. These domains have not yet been approved and are not yet available to be registered. Please continue to check back with us periodically and keep up to date with our new services.

Why do I have to prepay for my domain name registration? The domain registry requires that ICANN accredited registrars need to prepay for domain name submissions to the registry database (where all domain names are stored). There may be exceptions for corporations who would like to establish a business to business relationship with Registrar. In this case Registrar can credit your account in order to speed up registration process.

Once I have a domain name secured, how long may I use it? If there are no trademark disputes, your secured domain name will be yours for as long as you maintain the yearly registration fees.

How do I change my domain name? Once a domain name is registered, it is unchangeable.

What if my desired name is the same as a trademarked name? Generally, if you've registered the name in good faith, it's not a name belonging to an internationally known company, and you can show that you have a legitimate reason to use that name then you are likely to be able to keep that name. That may not be the case if it can be shown that you purchased the name for the express purpose of re-selling it to a company with a legitimate claim to the name.

Will my name and contact information be publicly available? Yes. Information about who is responsible for domain names is publicly available to allow rapid resolution of technical problems and to permit enforcement of consumer protection, trademark, and other laws. This information is available to the public through WHOIS service.

What if the name I want to use is already taken? You can choose an alternative domain name, or if you feel that you have a right to that domain name, you could follow the domain dispute policy and try to regain your domain name.

How long does it take to register a domain name? The domain registration is completed as soon Registrar receives the completed registration form and payment has been received. The registration process takes minutes. As a rule confirmation email is sent to the administrative contact with the details of the domain registration.
NOTE: The zone files, which make the Internet work, are updated twice daily, 7 days a week, twice a day. Requests received and completed by these times will be included in the next zone file update. However, your newly created/modified record may not be visible in the
WHOIS database for 24-48 hours from the time of the zone file is updated.

Who is the Administrative Contact? The Administrative Contact is the person or organization authorized by the domain name registrant to act on behalf of the legal entity listed as the owner of the domain name. The Administrative Contact should be able to answer non-technical questions about the legal entity's plans for using the domain name and the procedures for establishing sub-domains.

Who is the Billing Contact? The Billing Contact is the person or organization who will be invoiced for registrations and renewals of the domain name.

Who is the Technical Contact? Generally, the Technical Contact is the person or organization who maintains the domain name registrant's primary name server, resolves software, and database files. The Technical Contact person keeps the name server running and interacts with technical people in other domains to solve problems that affect the domain name. An ISP often performs this role.

I've read the FAQ and I still have questions, who can I contact? Please mail us your questions. We will respond to your questions within 24 hours.